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Devotionialism

The frequency at which an individual performs religious rituals and comparable behaviors, notably prayer and Bible reading, often measured independently of group activities such as church attendance.  See religiosity.

Citations:

Roof, Wade Clark. 1976. “Traditional Religion in Contemporary Society: A Theory of Local-Cosmopolitan Plausibility.” American Sociological Review 41:195-208.

The following are possible measures of Devotionialism that can be created using data from theARDA.com
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This measures how often a respondent prays. View related items in the Measurement Wizard:
    Examples  
Several files in theARDA's Data Archive have examples of this Measure.
Pray - 2008 General Social Survey (similar measures are available from previous waves of the GSS)
Q16 - 2005 Baylor Religion Survey
Pray_Freq - 2004 National Election Survey
Pray_Out - Spirit and Power: A 10 County Survey of Pentecostals (similar measures available in other locations)
Pray - 2005 Gallup Poll of Catholics
PrayAlon - 2007 National Study of Youth and Religion (similar measures on other waves)
DailyPry - Comparative Values Survey of Islamic Countries
Pray - Comparative Values Survey of Islamic Countries
PrayOft - 2007 Religion and Public Life Survey (similar measures on previous waves)
Pray_Out - Spirit and Power - Pentecostals in Brazil (similar measures available in other locations)
QN31A_D - Changing Faiths - Latinos and the Transformation of American Religion
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This measures how often someone reads sacred texts such as the Bible, Koran, sutras etc. View related items in the Measurement Wizard:
    Examples  
Several files in theARDA's Data Archive have examples of this Measure.
Q15 - 2005 Baylor Religion Survey
Bible Read - 2000 National Election Survey
ReadWord  - 1998 General Social Survey
ReadBibl - 2000 Religion and Politics Survey
Bible5 - 1995 Project Canada
RelCon6 - America's Evangelicals
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This measures how frequently respondents attend places of worship.  It is debatable how much measurement error is present in self-reported attendance, as people tend to over-estimate their participation (see Hadaway et al. 1993; Hout and Greeley 1998; Pressler and Stinson 1998; Smith 1998). View related items in the Measurement Wizard:
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